Thursday, July 12, 2012

Floyd and Atkins appear to be headed to Hargrave

After completing a summer course a couple weeks ago Leonard Floyd's family threw him a going away party, expecting the young linebacker to ride off towards Athens. On Tuesday he received official word from the NCAA Clearinghouse that an earlier online class on his transcript would not qualify him for enrollment this Fall. His aim is to rejoin the other recruits from the 2012 class in January.
Floyd got word on Tuesday and has been in touch with Georgia coaches to talk about a possible prep school for him to attend. He hopes to enroll at Georgia in January. Dodge County coach Rex Hodges said earlier today that Hargrave Military in Chatham,Va.,  would be a possibility.
“I’m disappointed, but I know after this I should be up there,” said Floyd, who did not report to Athens while the clearinghouse provided an answer. “It’s not anything but a few months.”
The clearinghouse has made a concerted effort in recent years to police these online courses more closely. Not to make any judgment on the one Floyd took, but many fly by night and illegitimate organizations have sullied the waters for a lot of high school students that look to gain credit this way.


Meanwhile, John Atkins may also end up at Hargarve Military Academy in Virginia. Officials are looking into his transcript and most recent ACT test scores before allowing him to enroll. Atkins is awaiting word which they hope to get soon.
“We’re still waiting,” Thomson coach Milan Turner said today. “He’s going to be at Georgia. It’s just whether he’s going to be there in August or December.”
Turner said that Atkins is still awaiting word from the NCAA clearinghouse.
Turner said Atkins fallback plan would probably be to attend Hargrave. Turner said the clearinghouse is looking at Atkins transcript and test scores. Atkins retook the ACT last month in hopes of being able to qualify.
“I think he was within like one or two points,” Turner said. “It was that close. They’ll go back and look to make sure. There’s always a chance of error where it could be a good one or two points. You never know.”